Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
Roots And Traces Of Contemporary Cultural Life In Tangier

Roots And Traces Of Contemporary Cultural Life In Tangier

September 30, 2021

Episode 131: Roots And Traces Of Contemporary Cultural Life In Tangier

In this discussion at Youmein 2021: Roots and Traces, anthropologist George Bajalia and journalist Aida Alami explore the roots and traces of contemporary cultural life in Tangier, especially as they relate to northern Morocco’s border regions. 

From questions of diversity and difference to the roots of present debates around representation, responsibility, and justice, Youmein 2021: Roots and Traces was an open-ended artistic inquiry into how the structures of our past have shaped our current moment. The traces of this past appear in unexpected places, both institutionally and in the social milieu from which we develop artistic reflections. Uncomfortable inequities and realities sit adjacent to the rise of powerful populist and progressive movements worldwide. Since Youmein began in 2014, xenophobia, isolationism, and neo-imperialism have grown simultaneously with new forms of solidarities and ways of being in-common. How will these movements leave their traces in our shifting social orders, and how will they transform, sediment, and root themselves differently? So far, each edition of the Youmein Festival has taken on themes speaking to Tangier as a space of both border and bridge: al-barzakh, crisis, imitation, limit(s), and desire. This year, those themes became the fertile ground on which we will reconvene and dig deep into what has come before and make choices about where we want to go next. After a year of isolated reflections, and alongside the Bicentennial of the Tangier-American Legation, Youmein invited the artists, speakers, and the public to critically reflect on the view from Tangier, and the cultures, peoples, and conditions which compose it. 

As a part of the 2021 Youmein Festival, Alami and Bajalia reflected on Tangier and its myths, past and present, and alternative cultural histories and present realities in this corner of the Strait of Gibraltar. From Maalem Abdellah Gourd and the renovation of his home in Tangier medina to the role of the Tangier American Legation Museum in the city, they share thoughts how different flows of people through the city, categorized differently as migrants, immigrants, “ex-pats,” and artists, intersect and overlap. 

 George Bajalia is an anthropologist (Ph.D., Columbia University), Assistant Professor at Wesleyan University, and theatre director based between Morocco and New York. He is the co-founder of the annual Youmein Creative Media Festival in Tangier, Morocco and the Northwestern University in Qatar Creative Media Festival. His work has been supported by the CAORC-Mellon Mediterranean Research Fellowship, the American Institute of Maghrib Studies Long-Term Fellowship, and the Fulbright Foundation, and he is a Fellow of the Tangier- American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies.

Aida Alami is a Moroccan freelance journalist who’s frequently on the road, reporting from North Africa, France, the Caribbean, and more recently, Senegal. She regularly contributes to the New York Times, and her work has also been published by the New York Review of Books, The Financial Times, and Foreign Policy. She earned her bachelor’s degree in media studies at Hunter College and her master’s degree in journalism at Columbia University. She mainly covers migration, human rights, religion, politics and racism. These days, Aida spends a lot of time in France, where she is directing a documentary feature on antiracism activists and police violence.

This episode was recorded on July 28th, 2021 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). 
 
Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).
Writing on Kingdom Walls: Practices, Narratives and Visual Politics of Graffiti and Street Art in Jordan and Morocco

Writing on Kingdom Walls: Practices, Narratives and Visual Politics of Graffiti and Street Art in Jordan and Morocco

September 9, 2021

Episode 130: Writing on Kingdom Walls: Practices, Narratives and Visual Politics of Graffiti and Street Art in Jordan and Morocco

Soufiane’s focus is a comparative study on cultural practices and narratives related to art production and its entanglement with resistance and visual politics in North Africa and the Middle East. By working on Morocco and Jordan, he mainly focus on wall-writings, street art, and graffiti in order to understand what wall expressions do, the extent to which they have a particularly political place in society, and how they relate to socio-political transformations.

Soufiane Chinig is a first-year PhD student of anthropology in the Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies at Freie Universität Berlin. His research in anthropology is on writing and painting on walls in Morocco and Jordan. He also holds an MA in Sociology and Anthropology from Hassan II University in Mohammedia, and a BA in Sociology from Mohammed V University. Alongside his academic work, he is also active in promoting Moroccan cultural heritage and evaluating urban policies in that country.
This episode was recorded on July 31st 2021, at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). 
 
Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).
L’école de médecine de Kairouan dans l’histoire de la médecine arabe médiévale : repères historiographiques

L’école de médecine de Kairouan dans l’histoire de la médecine arabe médiévale : repères historiographiques

July 29, 2021

Episode 129: L’école de médecine de Kairouan dans l’histoire de la médecine arabe médiévale : repères historiographiques

Dans ce podcast, qui prend la forme d’un retour historiographique, Dr. Meyssa Ben Saad présente l’école médicale de Kairouan, ses fondateurs, ses innovations et les traces qu’elle a laissé dans la longue histoire de la médecine.

De la médecine arabe médiévale, l’histoire a surtout retenu des grands noms comme Rāzī (865-925) et Ibn Sīnā (980-1037), ou encore Abul Qāsim al-Zahrāwī (940-1013), représentant respectivement l’école dite de Bagdad, et celle de Cordoue (Al-Andalus). Mais un autre centre culturel avait prospéré au IX-Xe siècle dans une autre sphère de l’empire arabo-islamique, à Kairouan, alors capitale de l’Ifriqya et grand pôle de rayonnement scientifique et culturel du IXe siècle. Plusieurs médecins y ont exercé, notamment Isḥāq Ibn ‘Imrān (IX-Xe), et ses disciples Isḥāq Ibn Sulaymān (832-932), et Ibn al-Jazzār (898-980), dont les œuvres ont circulé et ont influencé autant le monde arabe que l’Europe latine, mais dont certaines se sont faites appropriées par leur traducteur latin, Constantin l’Africain (1020-1087).

Meyssa BEN Saad est Docteur en Histoire des sciences spécialisée en Histoire de la zoologie arabe médiévale. Elle est chercheuse associé au Labo SPHère CNRS UMR 7219, Université Paris Diderot, et Coordinatrice du Pôle Recherche & Innovation à l’Université Mahmoud el Materi, Tunis.

Cet épisode a été enregistré entre Oran et Tunis le 3 Juin 2021 et s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle des conférences “Santé et humanités au Maghreb” de l'American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) en étroite collaboration avec Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). Professeur Marouane Ben Miled, Enseignant-chercheur à l'Ecole nationale d'Ingénieurs de Tunis (ENIT), a modéré la conférence et le débat.  

Montage : Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 
Protecting Morocco´s Rarest Forests

Protecting Morocco´s Rarest Forests

July 8, 2021

Episode 128: Protecting Morocco´s Rarest Forests

The high mountains of Talassemtane National Park protect some of the rarest trees and animals in Morocco and North Africa. Forest fires can have negative as well as positive effects on conserving these unique ecosystems. Research ranging from satellite images to tree-ring analysis is being applied to help forest managers protect the forest and adapt to changing climate.

Dr. Peter Fulé is a professor in the School of Forestry at Northern Arizona University. His research is at the intersection of forests, wildfire, climate and people around the world. Peter works with students and colleagues using multiple research techniques including tree rings to assess tree growth and forest fires over many centuries. Using models of forest growth and climate, they test forest restoration treatments and simulate changes into the future. He has taught and done research on five continents. Currently he is a visiting Fulbright Scholar in Tétouan, Morocco, working with Abdelmalek Essaâdi, University and Talassemtane National Park.

This episode was recorded on June 12th, 2021 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). 

Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Oran et ses expressions culturelles

Oran et ses expressions culturelles

July 2, 2021

Episode 31: Oran et ses expressions culturelles

Dans cet entretien-podcast accordé à Karim Ouaras, Pr. Hadj Miliani raconte la ville d’Oran et ses diverses expressions culturelles à l’ère contemporaine. Le choix de consacrer ce 31ème podcast à Oran n’est pas anodin car ce chiffre revoie au code de la wilaya d'Oran. Cette coïncidence numérique nous a paru une occasion de nous pencher sur le champ culturel oranais et de solliciter Pr. Hadj Miliani pour en parler. Ce podcast se veut donc un aperçu chargé d'enseignements et de détails précieux sur l’histoire de la ville d’Oran, ses populations, ses langues, ses cultures, ses aventures littéraires, ses musiques, ses pratiques religieuses, ses quartiers et ses lieux de sociabilité.  Les jeunes chercheurs y trouveront une infinité de pistes de recherche qui appellent un traitement urgent.

Hadj Miliani est professeur de littérature à l’Université de Mostaganem, chercheur associé au Centre de Recherche en Anthropologie Sociale et Culturelle à Oran, fondateur et animateur du Ciné-Pop d'Oran (1973-1987), membre du conseil scientifique du CEMA, membre du collectif de la revue Voix-Multiples (1981-1989), Commissaire du Festival du raï (2006-2007), responsable du pôle Ouest de l'École Doctorale Algéro-Française de Français (2004-2012) et responsable de la partie algérienne du réseau Langue Française et Expressions Francophones.

Il a notamment travaillé et travaille encore sur le champ littéraire et culturel algérien et ses diverses expressions. Parmi ses centres d’intérêt, nous pouvons citer sans être exhaustifs : littératures et sociétés en Algérie et au Maghreb ; littératures orales et expressions populaires ; musique Raï; anthropologie des pratiques culturelles, culturalité et interculturalités ; théories théâtrales et théorie de la littérature, analyse du discours médiatique, et édition et lecture en Algérie. Ces différentes thématiques sont au cœur de sa réflexion et de ses nombreuses publications scientifiques.

 
Musique et paroles : Bakhta, une chanson inspirée de la poésie du maître du Melhun, Abdelkader El Khaldi, interprétée par Cheb Khaled.


Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA).
Digitalisation des manuscrits arabes. Cas d’études : Les manuscrits traitant de la religion musulmane

Digitalisation des manuscrits arabes. Cas d’études : Les manuscrits traitant de la religion musulmane

July 1, 2021

Episode 127: Digitalisation des manuscrits arabes. Cas d’études : Les manuscrits traitant de la religion musulmane

Constituant une ressource appréciable pour les sciences humaines et sociales, les manuscrits berbères écrits en caractères arabes sont répartis un peu partout dans les pays du Maghreb. Un bon nombre de ces manuscrits se trouve dans des bibliothèques publiques mais beaucoup d’autres appartiennent à des particuliers.

La journée d’étude organisée par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) intitulée: Reflexions autour des manuscrits maghrébins, s’adresse aux chercheurs, enseignants-chercheurs et doctorants qui s’intéressent aux manuscrits. Les approches mobilisées dans les différentes communications programmées dans le cadre de cette journée sont riches et variées par les objets qu’elles traitent. Elles se penchent chacune à leur manière sur l’identification et la conservation des fonds documentaires, la paléographie, la codicologie, l’étude du contenu qui font l’objet de plusieurs branches de savoir telles les humanités numériques qui peuvent offrir des perspectives insoupçonnées.

Dans ce podcast Imène Ait Abderrahim, doctorante en informatique à l'Université d'Oran 1, présente son travail qui s'inscrit dans le domaine de la digitalisation des manuscrits, où elle explique les étapes et les règles importantes à suivre dans le processus de numérisation des manuscrits, et nous dit quels sont les manuscrits numérisés parmi ceux traitant de la religion musulmane. En effet, les manuscrits sont une principale source de recherche et malgré tous les efforts fournis, il est impossible de les conserver sous leur forme physique, notamment les plus anciens, en raison de leur détérioration rapide après un certain temps de stockage. D’après Imène Ait Abderrahim la numérisation apporte des solutions à ce genre de problèmes en améliorant la méthode de conservation et de préservation des documents et en facilitant leur accessibilité grâce à un espace de stockage numérique.

Cet episode s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle de conférences « Langues et sociétés au Maghreb ». Il a été enregistré à l’occasion de la journée d’études « Reflexions autour des manuscrits maghrébins », qui a eu lieu le 12 février 2020 au Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA). Pr. Ouahmi Ould-Braham, Professeur des Universités, fondateur de la revue académique Études et Documents Berbères, domiciliée à la Maison des Sciences de l'Homme - Paris Nord a modéré le débat.

Nous remercions infiniment Mohammed Boukhoudmi d'avoir interprété un morceau musical de Elli Mektoub Mektoub, pour les besoins de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 
Al-Harf as a site of Negotiating Modernism and Unity

Al-Harf as a site of Negotiating Modernism and Unity

June 24, 2021

Episode 126: Al-Harf as a site of Negotiating Modernism and Unity

The articulation of the Arabic letter in modern art in the Arab world has been a popular topic of discussion. The letter served 20th century artists on multiple levels and allowed for contradictory arguments. The letter became part of a more complex discourse of signs that drew on a collective and historical memory of difference, rupture and continuity. It disrupted and subverted the rhetoric of regional separation and promoted unity; its prominence in this imaginative and constructed discourse alluded to an emphasis on cultural overlaps, intersections, connections, and continuity between the Mashriq and the Maghreb. Equally, it gave artists comfort and confidence that came from the immediate perception of a marked cultural (and at times political) identity for the work. Manipulating the Arabic letter in art, thus, served as a mediator between national identity, heritage and modern art.

Nada Shabout is a Regent Professor of Art History and the Coordinator of the Contemporary Arab and Muslim Cultural Studies Initiative (CAMCSI) at the University of North Texas. She is the founding president of the Association for Modern and Contemporary Art from the Arab World, Iran and Turkey (AMCA). She is the author of Modern Arab Art: Formation of Arab Aesthetics, University of Florida Press, 2007; co-editor with S. Mikdadi, New Vision: Arab Art in the 21st Century, Thames & Hudson, 2009; and co-editor with S. Rogers and A. Lenssen, Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2018. She is also founding director of Modern Art Iraq Archive. Notable among exhibitions she has curated: Sajjil: A Century of Modern Art, 2010; traveling exhibition, Dafatir: Contemporary Iraqi Book Art, 2005-2009; and co-curator, Modernism and Iraq, 2009. In 2017, she received The Crow Collection of Asian Art’s Achievement in Asian Arts and Culture Award, and in 2018, the UNT Presidential Excellency Award. Shabout was the Project Advisor for the Saudi National Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2019. Shabout is on the Board of Directors, Visual Art Commission, Ministry of Culture, Saudi Arabia (2020-2023), the Board of The Academic Research Institute in Iraq (TARII), and the College Art Association (CAA) Board of Directors (2020-2024). Her current projects include, leading an AMCA team, as part of the Getty Foundation Connecting Art Histories initiative, in support of “Mapping Art Histories from the Arab World, Iran and Turkey,” coediting with Sarah Rogers and Suheyla Takesh, Modern Art in the Arabian Peninsula, and working on a new book project, Demarcating Modernism in Iraqi Art: The Dialectics of the Decorative, 1951-1979, both under contract with the American University in Cairo Press. 

This episode is part of the Modern Art in the Maghrib series, and was recorded on April 9, 2021, via zoom.  This is part of a larger Council of American Overseas Research Centers program organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and financed by the Andrew Mellon Foundation that seeks to collaborate with local institutions for a greater awareness of art historical research in north Africa.

Curating Modern Art from North Africa and West Asia: Methodological Conundrums and Contentions of Language

Curating Modern Art from North Africa and West Asia: Methodological Conundrums and Contentions of Language

June 17, 2021

Episode 125: Curating Modern Art from North Africa and West Asia: Methodological Conundrums and Contentions of Language

In this podcast, Suheyla Takesh addresses the methodological challenges in studying modernism in the non-West and the question of language and terminology for discussing developments that conceptually preside outside established art-historical frameworks. Focusing on two exhibitions as case studies: Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s (Grey Art Gallery, 2020) and Lasting Impressions: Baya Mahieddine (Sharjah Art Museum, 2021), Takesh considers curatorial strategies, pitfalls, and questions in studying the multiple and manifold histories of global modernism in the arts.

Suheyla Takesh is Curator at the Barjeel Art Foundation, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, where she works on research, curatorial development of exhibitions, and oversees the production of publications. She is the co-curator of Taking Shape: Abstraction from the Arab World, 1950s–1980s at the Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and co-editor of the eponymous volume of essays (Hirmer Publishers, 2020). Her work has been published in peer-reviewed journals, including the Rutgers Art Review (Department of Art History, Rutgers University) and Thresholds (Department of Architecture, MIT).

This episode is part of the Modern Art in the Maghrib series, and was recorded on May 6, 2021, via zoom.  This is part of a larger Council of American Overseas Research Centers program organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and financed by the Andrew Mellon Foundation that seeks to collaborate with local institutions for a greater awareness of art historical research in north Africa.

Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).
Berrechid 81. Retour sur une expérience collective à la lisière de l’art et de la psychiatrie

Berrechid 81. Retour sur une expérience collective à la lisière de l’art et de la psychiatrie

June 3, 2021

Episode 124: Berrechid 81. Retour sur une expérience collective à la lisière de l'art et de la psychiatrie

 

Dans ce podcast, Abdeslam Ziou Ziou revient sur la naissance et la disparition d’une expérience originale consistant à adopter une approche humaine de la psychiatrie en mobilisant d’autres acteurs dans le processus des soins mentaux. 

 

Berrechid 1981. Au début de l'été chaud de 1981, une activité inhabituelle eut lieu à l'Hôpital psychiatrique de Berrechid. Peintres, écrivains, réalisateurs et intellectuels, dont Mohamed Melehi et Mohamed Chebâa, sont invités à partager le quotidien des patients pendant une semaine. Cette expérience ouvrira l'hôpital, ce « sanctuaire de la folie » comme on l'appelle au Maroc, à son environnement immédiat. Des peintures murales y sont réalisées, des concerts et des spectacles ont lieu dans son enceinte, la presse y est invitée et des débats y sont organisés. Les habitants de Berrechid auront l’opportunité de visiter l'hôpital. Au-delà de son aspect anecdotique, cet événement s'inscrit dans une démarche globale initiée en 1975 par Dr. Abdellah Ziou Ziou, consistant à jumeler un intérêt pour les pratiques populaires de traitement des maladies mentales au Maroc et l'approche anti-psychiatrique ayant émergé à Trieste en Italie. 

 

Abdeslam Ziou Ziou est diplômé en anthropologie sociale de l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales de Paris. Il est chercheur indépendant et consultant dans le domaine des arts et de la culture au Maroc, et a été coordinateur de projet et de recherche à l’Atelier de l’Observatoire de Casablanca. Il a été lauréat du Projet de recherche transdisciplinaire « Houdoud » dirigé par la Chaire de Fatéma Mernissi (Université Mohammed V et HEM) – UNESCO. Sa recherche est soutenue par le projet School of Casablanca, initié par le KW Institute for Contemporary Art et Sharjah Art Foundation, en collaboration avec le Goethe-Institut MarokkoThinkArt et Zamân Books & Curating. Depuis 2020, il est boursier du CAORC / Andrew W. Mellon en histoire de l'art moderne au CEMAT.

 

Cet épisode s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle des conférences “Santé et humanités au Maghreb” de l'American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) en étroite collaboration avec Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). Ce podcast a été enregistré via Zoom le 25 mars 2021 entre Oran et Tunis. Dr. Samia Henni, historienne et théoricienne de l'architecture au département d’architecture de l’université de Cornell aux États-Unis, a modéré le débat.

 

Posté par: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 
Rencontre avec Denis Martinez, artiste plasticien et pédagogue. Un parcours en partage

Rencontre avec Denis Martinez, artiste plasticien et pédagogue. Un parcours en partage

May 27, 2021

Episode 123: Rencontre avec Denis Martinez, artiste plasticien et pédagogue. Un parcours en partage

 

Dans ce podcast, l'artiste plasticien et pédagogue, Denis Martinez, revient sur sa trajectoire dans le domaine de l’art et partage avec nous les grands moments de sa longue carrière artistique à travers la présentation du film documentaire intitulé « Denis Martinez, un homme en libertés », que le cinéaste Claude Hirsh lui a consacré en 2013.

Né le 30 novembre 1941 à Mars-el-Hadjadj, prés d'Oran en Algérie, Denis Martinez figure parmi les plus importants artistes peintres et poètes algériens contemporains. Enseignant à l'Ecole Supérieure des Beaux Arts d'Alger de 1963 à 1993. En 1967 il est fondateur, avec Choukri Mesli, du groupe Aouchem (tatouage). Exilé à Marseille en 1994, il enseigne à l'Ecole Supérieure d'Art d'Aix-en-Provence jusqu'en 2006.

Denis Martinez a été l'initiateur de plusieurs manifestations artistiques en France, dont ''Culture Algérienne Cultures Vivantes'' en 1995 à la Friche de la Belle de Mai à Marseille, ''Expressions algériennes contemporaines'' en 2000 à Aix-en-Provence et ''Jonctions'' Djazair en 2003 à la Friche de la Belle de Mai. Depuis 2000, il réoccupe régulièrement son atelier dans sa demeure familiale à Blida. En juillet 2004, il participe avec Hassan Metref et Salah Silem, à la création du festival nomade ''Raconte Arts'' en Kabylie. C'est à partir de cette date qu'il se lance dans une aventure qui l'amène à intervenir régulièrement avec des créations éphémères in situ dans les Tajmaats de différents villages de Kabylie. L'artiste a des œuvres au Musée Nationale des Beaux-arts d'Alger et dans des collections particulières et publiques en Algérie et en France. Il est l'auteur de plaquettes de poésie, de portfolio, et d'anthologies illustrées. 

Son parcours a inspiré plus d'un, l'écrivain Nourredine Saadi a publié Denis Martinez, peintre algérien aux éditions Barzakh-Le bec en l'air. Le cinéaste Jean-Pierre Lledo lui a consacré trois courts métrages (1985,1996). Dominique Devigne, sa compagne, a réalisé plusieurs courts métrages vidéo sur ses interventions en Algérie de 1990 à nos jours. En 2013, le cinéaste Claude Hirsh lui consacre un film intitulé : « Denis Martinez, un homme en libertés ».

Cet épisode a été enregistré le 13 mai 2018 au  Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Arts et lettres au Maghreb ».

Dr. Mohamed Bensalah, Enseignant-chercheur à l’Université d’Oran 2 et cinéaste a modéré le débat.

Nous remercions notre ami Ignacio Villalón, étudiant en master à l'EHESS, pour sa prestation à la guitare du titre A vava Inouva de Idir pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.
 
Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA).
Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App