Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
Land, Labor, and Youth Aspirations in the Gharb, Morocco

Land, Labor, and Youth Aspirations in the Gharb, Morocco

October 10, 2019

Episode 76: Land, Labor, and Youth Aspirations in the Gharb, Morocco

In this podcast, David Balgley, Masters candidate in Arab Studies at Georgetown University, discusses some of the factors impacting the labor decisions of young people in the Gharb, including the ways in which gender, class, and access to productive capital create and constrain the opportunities for youth in the Moroccan countryside. In addition, he breaks down how young rural people negotiate the tension between maintaining social ties to their ancestral land with economic pressures to migrate. In this context, David explores how the privatization of collective land in the Gharb could stimulate new labor possibilities, livelihood shifts, and youth aspirations.

In 2015, the Government of Morocco and the Millennium Challenge Corporation, a U.S. aid agency, signed the Morocco Land and Employability Compact. This Compact includes a project to title 51,000 hectares of collective land in the Gharb region, thereby turning it into private property. The project’s discourse emphasizes that integrating land into market systems leads to greater productivity, enhanced access to credit, and increased land values, all of which benefit rural populations. However, government reports largely fail to account for how agrarian transformations resulting from privatization have differentiated impacts on different rural population groups, particularly young people.

The Gharb plain, which is located along the north-western Atlantic coast, has long been one of the most agriculturally productive regions of Morocco. Since the 1970s, demographic growth, land fragmentation, and the rise of foreign investment in agro-business have all contributed to shifts in rural livelihoods and income-generating activities. Many households no longer rely solely on agriculture as their primary source of income. As a result, young people living in collective land in the Gharb are pursuing diverse livelihood strategies, even as their future aspirations diverge significantly from those of previous generations.

This episode was recorded on August 23rd 2019, at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). 

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

The Husyanid Dynasty and Spatial Control and Judicial Control of the Enslaved Blacks of Tunis

The Husyanid Dynasty and Spatial Control and Judicial Control of the Enslaved Blacks of Tunis

September 25, 2019

Episode 75: The Husyanid Dynasty and Spatial Control and Judicial Control of the Enslaved Blacks of Tunis

In this podcast, Dr. Ismael Montana, Associate Professor of History at Northern Illinois University, discusses the impact of the Husaynid dynasty (1705-1957) on the enslaved Sudanic communities of Tunis. Montana does so by looking at the Stambali, a ritual of musical possession based on the fusion of the Hausa Bori cult and popular Islam, performed primarily by the Sudanic communities of Tunis. 

He argues that the Husaynid dynasty actively sought to transform Sudanic communities into on of several corporatist communities in the Tunisian Beylic, by means of spatial control. In the early eighteenth century, the Husaynid Beys promoted the sainthood of Sidi Saad al-Abid, a former slave from Borno, in order to serve as a rallying figure for the freed and enslaved Sudanic communities that had been settled in Tunis as a result of the trans-Saharan slave trade. The Sufi brotherhood that formed around this saint was given a judicial-administrative apparatus, designed to self-regulate the community, and structure it within the state's religio-political scheme. Montana maintains that while the Sudani community entered the Husaynid political system via the Stambali, the processes by which that group was integrated relied on its specific religious culture, which continued to set them apart from the rest of Tunisian society.

Ismael Montana's research interests include the social and economic history of slavery, culture, and citizenship in Northwest Africa and the western Mediterranean basin from the 18th century to the present.  He is currently the Vice-President of West Africa Research Association (WARA). 

This podcast was recorded at the CEMAT Director’s Conference on “Narratives of Legitimacy and the Maghrebi State: Power, Law and Comparison” held on 21 June 2019 in Sidi Bou Said, Tunisia. 

We thank Dr. Tamara Turner, Ethnomusicologist and Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Center for the History of Emotions, for her interpretation of Natiro/ Ya Joro, from the Hausa repertoire of diwan.

Edited and posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA). 

Volunteer Networks in the Mediterranean / Réseaux de volontariat en Méditerranée

Volunteer Networks in the Mediterranean / Réseaux de volontariat en Méditerranée

September 18, 2019

Episode 74: Volunteer Networks in the Mediterranean / Réseaux de volontariat en Méditerranée

Dans ce podcast, Brooke Durham, doctorante au département d'histoire à Stanford University, propose une étude du volontariat comme stratégie de développement en Algérie et au Maghreb avant et après l’indépendance en Algérie.

Sa thèse cherche à mettre en valeur l’histoire des associations sociales en Algérie entre 1945 et 1972. Son travail sur les associations de volontariat en Algérie met en évidence les rôles que l’action volontaire pouvait être amené à remplir au niveau national, international et régional. À partir des sources d’archives en France, en Suisse et en Algérie, et des entretiens avec des anciens volontaires, cette communication se concentre sur une poignée d’associations de volontariat active en Algérie pendant la deuxième moitié du XXème siècle, notamment, le Service Civil International (SCI), Jeunesse du Front de Libération Nationale (JFLN), et Jeunes Travailleurs Volontaire Algériens (JTVA). Pour chacune de ces associations la question de qui doit être mobilisé pour quel type de service volontaire est toujours pertinente, ainsi que la tension entre une orientation nationaliste, régionaliste, ou internationaliste du volontariat en Algérie et au Maghreb. 

La communication de Brooke Durham a été enregistrée durant le Workshop annuel de American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) à Sidi Bou Saïd en Tunisie le 20 et 21 juillet 2019 intitulé: La Méditerranée vue d'Afrique du nord

Ce podcast s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, Histoire au Maghreb ».

Pour consulter les diaporamas associés à ce podcast, veuillez visiter notre site web: www.themagribpodcast.com

Nous remercions Mr. Souheib Zallazi, (Étudiant au CFTTunisie) et Mr. Malek Saadani (Étudiant à l'ULT, Tunisie), pour leur interprétation de el Ardh Ardhi de Sabri Mesbah, pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast. Souheib au mélodica et Malek à la guitare.

Réalisation & montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Le Prix de l’Engagement Politique dans la Tunisie Autoritaire

Le Prix de l’Engagement Politique dans la Tunisie Autoritaire

September 11, 2019

Episode 73: Le Prix de l'Engagement Politique dans la Tunisie Autoritaire

Dans ce podcast, Dr. Michaël Bechir Ayari discute son dernier livre, Le prix de l'engagement politique dans la Tunisie autoritaire

Cet ouvrage retrace l’histoire des militants tunisiens d’extrême gauche et du mouvement islamiste durant la période autoritaire tunisienne, et apporte une analyse biographique de leurs combats politiques de jeunesse. À travers cette perspective, l’apport essentiel de ce travail consiste en la formulation de la notion de l’origine « socio-identitaire » des militants qui, selon l’auteur, permet d’illustrer et d’expliquer les différents intérêts et prises de position politiques des uns et des autres. 

À travers la conversation sur la thématique initiale du livre, ce podcast a été aussi une opportunité pour élargir le débat à des questions plus contemporaines et a permis d’orienter le débat vers l’effet de cette fracture sociale et identitaire sur les dynamiques politiques actuelles en Tunisie. Il a été notamment question de contextualiser les controverses émanant de certains processus engagés suite à la révolution tunisienne, tel que celui de la justice transitionnelle. 

Michaël Ayari est analyste senior pour International Crisis Group depuis 2011. Il est docteur en sciences politiques, chercheur associé à l'Institut de recherches et d'études sur le monde arabe et musulman (IREMAM) d'Aix-en-Provence. Auteur de nombreux articles sur la Tunisie et le monde arabe, il contribue régulièrement à la revue L'Année du Maghreb (CNRS-Éditions).

Sous-forme d'entretien avec Dr. Meriem Guetat, Directrice Assistante au CEMAT, ce podcast s'inscrit dans le cadre du cycle de conférences Pensées contemporaines et a été enregistré le 11 Avril 2019 au Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).

Nous remercions notre ami Mohammed Boukhoudmi pour son interpretation de l'extrait de nouba, "Dziriya," par Dr. Noureddine Saoudi pour l'introduction et la conclusion de ce podcast.

Posté par: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

Moroccan Shari’a In The Age Of Colonialism

Moroccan Shari’a In The Age Of Colonialism

September 4, 2019

Episode 72: Moroccan Shari’a In The Age Of Colonialism 

In this podcast, Ari Schriber, PhD Candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, discusses his research project entitled: 'Moroccan Shari’a in The Age of Colonialism.' Ari Schriber performed his dissertation fieldwork as a grantee of the American Institute of Maghrib Studies from 2018-2019. Likewise, he is a former Fulbright research grantee (2013-2014) and FLAS grantee (2012) in Morocco. He holds an AM (masters) in NELC from Harvard and a BA from the University of Virginia.

This episode was recorded on July 25th 2019, at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM).

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979

Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979

July 21, 2019

Episode 71: Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979

In this podcast, Professor Todd Shepard, historian at Johns Hopkins University, discusses his book Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979, which is a history of how and why, during the period from 1962 through 1979, highly sexualized claims about Arab men saturated important French public discussions. The sexual revolution in France, he argues, was profoundly shaped by the continuing effects of the Algerian war of liberation and its revolution.  Sex, France, and Arab Men reveals how the struggle for Algerian independence and the sexual revolution in France are intertwined moments. Oftentimes imagined as an American or European invention, Shepard demonstrates how the struggle for sexual liberation was shaped by and grew out of the mid-twentieth century worldwide anticolonial movements.  The monograph, his second, first appeared in France as Mâle décolonisation. “L’homme arabe” et la France, de l’indépendance algérienne à la révolution iranienne.

This podcast is a recorded keynote lecture of the February 2019 Harry Franck Guggenheim Foundation (HFG), CEMA and CEMAT workshop on violence and social sciences methodology, held in Sidi Bou Said, Tunisia. 

We thank Dr. Jonathan Glasser, Cultural Anthropologist at the College of William & Mary for his istikhbar in sika on viola for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Interview with Mieczysław Boduszyński about his book: U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals

Interview with Mieczysław Boduszyński about his book: U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals

July 10, 2019

Episode 70: Interview with Mieczysław Boduszyński about his book: U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals

In this podcast, Professor Mieczysław Boduszyński discusses his forthcoming book, U.S. Democracy Promotion in the Arab World: Beyond Interests vs. Ideals (Lynne Rienner, 2019), which looks at the place of democracy promotion in American foreign policy. Though a key pillar of U.S. foreign policy, democracy promotion is the subject of significant debate within and outside of policy-making circles, especially regarding why, where, when, and how the United State promotes democracy. 

In this podcast, Prof. Boduszyński looks at the temporal shift in U.S. support for the 2011 Arab Uprisings during the Obama administration - first supporting and later retreating from democracy promotion - highlighting the longstanding tension between interests and ideals in U.S. foreign policy. The podcast concludes with a discussion on the Trump administration's policy on democratic promotion and its relationship with regional autocrats. 

Mieczysław (Mietek) Boduszyński is Assistant Professor of Politics and International Relations at Pomona College in California, USA. He was previously a diplomat with the U.S. Department of State with postings in Albania, Egypt, Iraq, Japan, Kosovo, and Libya.

Professor Jacob Mundy of Colgate University, and current Visiting Fulbright Scholar in Tunisia, led the interview, which was recorded as part of the Contemporary Thought series on March 20th, 2019 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).

We thank our friend Mohamed Boukhoudmi for his interpretation of the extract of "Nouba Dziriya" by Dr. Noureddine Saoudi for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces: Islam, Security, and Social Movements in Tunisia

Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces: Islam, Security, and Social Movements in Tunisia

July 2, 2019

Episode 69: Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces: Islam, Security, and Social Movements in Tunisia

In this podcast, Dr. Tavis D. Jules is interviewed on his recent book, Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces : Islam, Security and Social Movements in Tunisia, co-authored with Dr. Teresa Barton. Jules and Barton trace the development of Tunisia’s educational system to the 2010/2011 contestatory events that led to the Tunisian Revolution and embarked on a period of large-scale institutional reform, including education sector reform. This post-Revolutionary reform has primarily been concerned with providing young Tunisian citizens with the necessary skills for a rapidly changing job market.  In his presentation, Jules engages with the issue of how a strong educational system produced generations of educated citizens, but whose most recent generation is frustrated by a weakened socio-economic system unable to absorb a young and educated workforce.  The book itself traces the history and evolution of Tunisia’s educational system since independence in 1956 to the contemporary period,  and ties its analysis to an « educational transitologies framework ». Through several chapters, the book engages and explores themes related to education, including security, gender, political Islam and social movements and analyses these comparatively pre- and post-political transition which commenced in 2011. 

In this podcast, Dr. Jules was invited to answer a number of questions touching upon the following themes : 

  • Definition of the concept of conscientization and its importance to understand the role of education.
  • The common link that the book draws between education and Islam, security and social movements. 
  • The book’s methodology to study 'educational transitologies' and what the example of Tunisia tells us about this theoretical framework. 

Dr. Tavis D. Jules is Associate Professor in Cultural and Educational Policy at Loyola University, specializing in Comparative and International Education. His research interests include, regionalism and governance, transitory spaces, and policy challenges in small island developing states (SIDS).

CEMAT Assistant Director Dr. Meriem Guetat, CEMAT led the interview, which was recorded as part of the Contemporary Thought series on December 13th, 2018 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).

Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Contrôler la Casbah:  la police coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950

Contrôler la Casbah: la police coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950

June 27, 2019

Episode 68: Contrôler la Casbah: la police coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950

Dans ce Podcast, Danielle Beaujon, doctorante en histoire à New York University, présente une conférence dans le cadre de ses recherches doctorales qui portent sur la thématique suivante : Contrôler la Casbah: La Police Coloniale à Alger et Marseille, 1920-1950.

La police coloniale a rempli plusieurs fonctions dans les villes méditerranéennes de Marseille et Alger. Ses agents ont servi à la fois comme exécuteurs répressifs de l’ordre colonial et comme intermédiaires recherchés. Dans cette présentation, Danielle Beaujon interroge le rapport quotidien entre les agents de la police coloniale et les Algériens dans les deux villes portuaires, Marseille et Alger entre 1920 et 1950. S'appuyant sur des documents d'archives, Danielle Beaujon a examiné la façon dont les hiérarchies coloniales, elles-mêmes en train d’être construites, ont influencé le contrôle des Algériens en métropole ainsi qu’en Algérie.

La conférence de Danielle Beaujon a été programmée dans le cadre du cycle des conférences « Histoire du Maghreb, Histoire au Maghreb », co-organisé par le Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) et le Centre de Recherche en Anthropologie sociale et culturelle (CRASC). Elle a eu lieu le 16 juin 2019 au CRASC.  Dr. Amar Mohand Amar, Historien et Maître de recherche au CRASC, a modéré le débat.

Pour consulter les diaporamas associés à ce podcast veuillez visiter notre site web www.themaghribpodcast.com

Nous remercions infiniment Mohammed Boukhoudmi d'avoir interprété un morceau musical de Elli Mektoub Mektoub, pour les besoins de ce podcast.

Réalisation et montage: Hayet Lansari, Bibliothécaire / Chargée de la diffusion des activités scientifiques (CEMA). 

William Wordsworth and te French Revolution

William Wordsworth and te French Revolution

June 13, 2019

Episode 67: William Wordsworth and te French Revolution 

Dr. Mounir Khélifa studied English at the Sorbonne and Yale University where he received his MA and PhD, respectively. A professor of English language and literature for more than three decades, he taught poetics, comparative literature, and literary theory at the University of Tunis. Former director of the graduate program in English, Dr. Khélifa was also a senior advisor to the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, where he was responsible for international cooperation and curriculum reform. Currently, Dr. Khélifa runs the School for International Training study-abroad program in Tunisia. He is a lifetime member of the Tunisian Academy for the Arts, Letters, and Sciences, Beit al-Hikma.

William Wordsworth was the only English poet of his generation to have been an eyewitness to the French Revolution. To the momentous event he devoted no less than three books in his autobiographical epic poem, The Prelude.

It is conventionally accepted that his relation to the revolution altered radically during the course of the events, and that this relation went from passionate enthusiasm at the storming of the Bastille to doubt and fear during the Reign of Terror to utter rejection and denial at the rise of Napoleon and during the ensuing Napoleonic Wars.    

Yet even as this doxa accounts for the poet’s changing attitude towards the revolution, it fails to explain the complex emotional and intellectual processes that activated the change.  It fails mainly to consider that the change occurs in a poem designed to ratify “the growth of the poetic mind.”  Wordsworth has no pretense to be a historian. His recounting of the revolutionary events, he warns the reader, is justified only insofar as the events have been “storm or sunshine to [his] mind.” 

Dr Mounir Khélifa argues that if the expression “storm and sunshine” refers to the aesthetic emotion known as the sublime (beauty that has terror in it, Edmund Burke), then this emotion never abated in him and that throughout his entire life he kept “daring sympathies with power” whenever he recalled the French Revolution.  

This lecture was co-organised by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) and the École Normale Superieure d’Oran (ENS).

This episode is part of the Arts & Literature in the Maghrib lecture series and was recorded on April 24th,  2019, at the École Normale Supérieure d’Oran (ENS).

Pr. Sidi Mohamed Lakhdar Barka, Professor of Comparative Literature from the Department of English at University of Oran 2 moderated the lecture.

We thank Dr. Jonathan Glasser, Cultural Anthropologist at the College of William & Mary for his istikhbar in sika on viola for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.

Realization and editing:  Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).